Career

Engaging India’s Workforce of the Future

24 January, 2019
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“The accelerated advance of technology in India will influence the human-work dynamic in significant, and unexpected, ways.”

Digital technologies in India are driving sweeping transformations throughout workforces and operational processes across a spectrum of industries. These changes, however, have employers and employees wondering how automation and modern technologies will impact not only employees’ jobs and lives, but how employers engage with the needs of an evolving workforce. Let’s explore the trends that are revolutionizing workforces in India:

How will technology-led disruption define the future of work?
 

The accelerated advance of technology in India will influence the human-work dynamic in significant, and unexpected, ways. The relationship between people and machines will be a constantly evolving association that will balance the benefits of automated processes and machine learning with human emotions and intelligence. Research shows that innate cognitive human abilities—such as emotional intelligence and capacity to innovate—cannot be replaced by machines. Future workforces will be shaped around this reality. For example, while most banking transactions in India are possible online, the human element is still key to investment advice and interactions with wealth relationship managers. Future technologies will automate tasks and enhance productivity while also elevating the impact of human relationships.

How has digital transformation changed the workforce?
 

Traditionally, tech firms in India set the tone for the hiring season by employing large numbers of graduates from engineering schools that are assigned to a pyramidal organizational structure. The first three layers of the pyramid, organized according to years of experience (1-3 years, 3-6 years, and 6-9 years), contributed to roughly 80 percent of the total headcount. However, from a budgetary perspective this number represented no more than 30 percent of the total non-executive wage bill. This organizational structure has changed significantly as pyramid designs were replaced with diamond architectures where some entry-level work is automated, improving margins and streamlining efficiencies by having mid-level engineers focus on building technical skills that will deliver value well in the future.

Tech jobs in roles such as IT support and project management are the first to be automated, resulting in decreased headcounts of more than 15 percent in some companies. Other tech fields are a mixed bag of increased or reduced headcounts based on experience levels. Tech jobs are being automated in the areas of remote infrastructure, software testing and release, and applications development. However, headcounts are increasing in data services, UI/UX, cloud computing, and solutions architectures that bring together domain/functional knowledge to create solutions for clients. In fact, jobs in these areas are increasing by more than 100 percent and help drive an organizations non-linear growth. Companies are also disrupting organizational structures by dipping into nontraditional talent pools such as freelancers, part-time/contingent works, crowdsourced talent and lesser-known coopetition models.

What will it take to engage workforces of future?
 

With changing business models and declining overseas opportunities, technology players in India are focusing on quality and content to drive value proposition. Tech businesses naturally focus on innovation, and value environments where technological innovation and human collaboration thrive. Employee engagement has moved beyond the base level of Maslow’s needs into the self-actualization orbit where workers seek a sense of purpose and personal fulfillment from their jobs.

Significant changes are occurring in workforce engagement models throughout India. Curated learning experiences, for example, offer new career development opportunities to flex and gig workers. Career paths for full-time employees, which traditionally foster vertical trajectories, are evolving to include customized growth experiences based on various personas defined by specific demographics, mannerisms, goals, aspirations, interests, and communication styles. These initiatives create value through the sustained and frequent reinforcement of goal-oriented rewards for high achievers who are inspired by different motivations.

Leave benefits, for instance, could align with popular national days in India. New entrants could use leave time for “Propose Day,” while managerial employees could use their leave time for “Annual Day” or other childcare-related holidays. Free agents and gig employees may apply their leave times toward attending social networking events. If we were to extend this persona-based proposition to allowances, new entrants may find value in “dating allowances,” and manager-level professionals may appreciate an “entertainment allowance” that pays for meals with family and friends. Allowances may also extend company benefits or product discounts to an “uberized workforce.”

New app-style benefits in India are taking employee engagement beyond learning opportunities. Benefits include wellness services through health portals, health and psychological counselling, and the personalization of rewards through online crediting and the redemption of rewards points. The future of employee engagement will feature flexible and customized benefits that cater to individual needs, from carpooling to stress management. Workforces of the future will redefine the meaning of employee engagement through the personalization of benefits and passions—ensuring that personal fulfillment remains an important part of professional success in India. 

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Mustafa Faizani | 30 May 2019

There is no doubt that family businesses are prominent across the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) in various industries. From small to renowned multinational corporations, family owned and managed companies are the foundation of the modern country. Many of these businesses have been in existence for five decades and still exist today. As the first-generation of individuals begin to step down, we're seeing a shift to second and third generation ownership. It is estimated that, in the Middle East, approximately $1 trillion in assets will be transferred to the next generation of family owned companies over the next decade.1 The transition from the first to the second generation, and increasingly, the second to third generation, will have tremendous implications on the sustainability and growth of these companies. As a result, legacy and succession planning are becoming an increasing concern for the region, as many businesses stand in a position to pass the baton over to the next generation. While existing leaders prefer to keep the business within the family, there are many challenges that can arise if there is no preparation done well in advance of the transition. This lack of preparation is common, as it's easy for leaders to be so involved in the day-to-day running of the business that they lose sight of longer-term, more strategic priorities. The penalty for failing to tackle leadership or ownership changes can be significant. Lack of a clear, strategic succession plan can cause disruption, conflict and uncertainty within the business, making it vulnerable to an acquisition or takeover. The long-term survival of a business and the preservation of the wealth that has been built, will likely depend on getting ahead of those changes through legacy and succession planning. Have a Strong Internal Talent Strategy   Planning can have many benefits. The priority is to ensure leadership continuity, which is an important factor in keeping employees engaged and ensuring retention. It also allows time to hire internal candidates for key positions, therefore avoiding the cost of external searches. Internal candidates know the organization better and tend to have a better chance of success than external hires. Additionally, promoting internally helps retain good people, because they see opportunities for growth and will stay on to pursue them. A strong talent strategy can also fill leadership positions quickly, not only avoiding the potential cost of unfilled positions and errors from a lack of leadership, but helping to circumvent legal consequences from potential missteps. Evaluate Your Operating Structure and Execute in Phases   Leaders often first look at the current reporting structure and organizational chart to evaluate who the next leader(s) may be. However, it is also important to think of an organization's operating structure and how it may change over time. Leaders must consider how functional activities will evolve as the business grows, while also looking at the experience of the shareholders during this significant change. These factors need to be reviewed before selecting the people who will take over the function. As part of this process, it's critical that succession planning is done in phases. Firstly, it is important to identify the roles critical to the business and the pool of successors that best fit the organization's requirements. Ensuring the right assessments to determine readiness levels can solidify the next generation of company leadership. Multiple assessments methods are suitable, including looking at historical measures of performance, 360 leadership behaviors tests and predictive measures of potential. Involve Executive Leadership   Lastly, executive leadership involvement is essential in the succession planning process. The organization's top leaders should be fully on board with the plan to bring in the next generation and meet frequently to discuss strategic talent management issues. The ultimate results of a business succession plan depend on the adherence and commitment to it from the organization. It requires a high level of engagement and continuous efforts to keep the succession moving forward over time, despite inevitable interruptions of operational needs and unexpected changes. To learn more about succession planning for family businesses, visit us here. 1Augustine, Babu, "Middle East's Family Businesses Get Serious on Sustainability" Gulf News, November 7, 2015,https://gulfnews.com/how-to/your-money/middle-easts-family-businesses-get-serious-on-sustainability-1.1614502.

John Benfield | 16 May 2019

Times are changing. The world is moving toward an ethical, long-term sustainable way of investing. Forward-looking governments are increasingly emphasizing the role of financial markets in fostering sustainable development. Investor demand for responsible investment (RI) solutions has increased significantly, as observed by the growth of assets being allocated to RI-related investments. Combined with the shift toward low-cost equity index tracking, this has led to an increase in the number of RI indices that are now available. We expect RI indices to become an important first step in integrating environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) considerations for many investors with existing passive or factor-based investments. At Mercer, we define Responsible Investment as the integration of ESG factors into investment management processes and ownership practices in the belief that these factors can have a material impact on financial performance. Meanwhile, in the GCC region, with efforts to diversify the economy, governments are gaining awareness around the importance of responsible investing. The GCC makes up four of the six Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWF), which founded the One Planet SWF Working Group in December 2017 at the occasion of the "One Planet Summit" in Paris. Within the UAE itself, numerous initiatives — such as The Green Economy for Sustainable Development and Green Agenda — are propelling the country into the future of responsible investing. In keeping with the diversification strategy, these initiatives support Vision 2030 by aligning with the nation's economic growth ambitions and environmental sustainability goals. Abu Dhabi is contributing to the agenda in a major way through various developments, such as Masdar City — a multi-billion dollar green energy project.1 Meanwhile, Dubai set up an energy and environment park called Enpark — a Free Zone for clean energy and environmental technology companies.2 As the business case for responsible investing gets stronger in the GCC, there is a growing demand for incorporating ESG factors or sustainability themes into investment decisions and processes. Institutions are factoring the benefits of responsible investing, not only to their investments but also to their reputation and bottom line. Sustainable investing offers attractive opportunities to tap into the growth potential of companies providing solutions to various challenges of resource scarcity, demographic changes and changes in the evolving policy responses to a range of environmental and social issues. Studies and industry evidence have shown the benefits of integrating ESG factors on the company's long-term performance. For example, Deutsche Bank reviewed more than 100 academic studies in 2012 and concluded that companies with higher ESG ratings had a lower cost of capital in terms of debt and equity. Another study in 2015 by Hsu (Professor at the National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan) and Cheng (Professor at the National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan) found that socially responsible firms perform better in terms of credit ratings and have lower credit risk.3 With companies operating against the setting of public concerns around environmental and social issues, incorporating ESG considerations is now also considered best practice. Employees increasingly want to work for and invest in companies that make a positive environmental impact. Global initiatives and bodies, such as the CFA Institute, have highlighted the financial and reputational risks of not taking ESG considerations into account. While the GCC is beginning to understand the benefits of applying ESG, the region hasn't been too far from its concept. Sharia-compliant investing has been around for the last two decades. Both frameworks apply the negative screening approach and seek investments which provide a sustainable return. With the combination of ESG factors and Sharia screening, Islamic investors can improve investment performance while meeting social and environmental goals at the same time. As the UAE is now focusing on diversifying its investments, it can highly benefit from creating a responsible investing market and culture where strategy and processes go hand-in-hand as important steps for successful integration. When seeking sustainable growth, an additional layer of insight and oversight is extremely crucial to mitigate emerging risks, like climate change. To that end, implementing ESG assessments will help set clear KPIs and identify where and how projects generate value and mitigate risks associated with them. For example, Mercer applies an Investment Framework for Sustainable Growth with its clients, which distinguishes between the financial implications (risks) associated with environmental, social and corporate governance factors and the growth opportunities in industries most directly affected by sustainability issues. Measuring impact and mitigating risks has become increasingly important and represents a strong investment governance process. The benefits of adopting ESG are numerous. While the GCC has started with the implementation of ESG principles, more work still needs to be done in making sure governments are fully engaged with stakeholders, including investors, and strategies are aligned across the region. Regulatory pressures to meet global standards of ESG integration will only increase in the coming years. Instead of hiding from it, it is time for companies, investors and governments to come together and define a way of working that moves the GCC forward in terms of responsible investing and sustainable growth. 1Carvalho, Stanley, "Abu Dhabi To Invest $15 Billion in Green Energy," Reuters, January 21, 2008, https://www.reuters.com/article/environment-emirates-energy-green-dc/abu-dhabi-to-invest-15-billion-in-green-energy-idUSL2131306920080121 2Energy and Environment Park:Setup Your Company In Enpark, UAE Freezone Setup, https://www.uaefreezonesetup.com/enpark-freezone 3Chen, Yu-Cheng and Hsu, Feng Jui, "Is a Firm's Financial Risk Associated With Corporate Social Responsibility?"Emerald City, 2015, https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/MD-02-2015-0047

Danielle Guzman | 16 May 2019

Imagine you're tasked with creating a brand-new city from scratch. A broad, meandering river cuts through a level plateau of arable land, and you're responsible for whatever's to come. What do you do first? Lay out a street grid? Install emergency services? Block off land for preservation and development? Think wisely, because your next decision may determine the fate of your city's inhabitants for generations to come. At its core, this is the same decision that local leaders of the world's emerging megacities face today. They may not be starting from scratch, but tomorrow's megacities face a similar potential for dynamic growth and expansion as yesterday's frontier boom towns. What should be their number-one priority when focusing on future development? People. According to a recent report from Mercer titled, "People First: Driving Growth in Emerging Megacities," we must prioritize humans (not robots) for a competitive advantage. We must design technology with humans at the center. To quote Pearly Siffel, Strategy and Geographic Expansion Leader, International, at Mercer, "In the future, work will be less about 'using' technology and more about 'interacting' with technology." 1. Technology Is Fungible, People Are Not   The well-worn axiom that AI will transform the future of work is more true today than ever before, but it misrepresents how the future will be transformed. What may start as a race to adopt and leverage AI in the workplace will inevitably end in a saturation of technology: As soon as one firm unlocks the full potential of automation, it'll be a matter of time before their competitors replicate the model. Who wins in a world where AI is in every office? The organizations with the best talent. Consumer and workforce demands will inevitably adapt to an AI-empowered future, and the real differentiator will be the human skills, such as critical thinking, emotional intelligence and creative problem solving, paired with technology. A recent report by the World Economic Forum outlines the 10 skills humans will need to create value in an increasingly automated world, and it's a great reminder that peoplemust remain the focus if we're to build anything that works in the future of work.1 Tamara McCleary, Founder and CEO of Thulium, summarized this point well in a recent conversation we had: "If we are distracted by all that glitters with the promise of a frictionless future with AI, then we will surely miss the mark. While technology may be an economic accelerator in the future of work, people are still the core drivers of sustained productivity." 2. When AI Is Everywhere, People Will Still Go Somewhere   Everyone's familiar with the dystopic tomorrow-lands depicted in literature and film: techno-centric, automated megacities serviced by an army of robots where people are undervalued. This is not how I envision the future of work. The proliferation of AI may mean some jobs will be automated, but those displaced workers still represent remarkable potential to cities, employers and economies. McKinsey estimates that disruption from digital transformation, automation and AI will force approximately 14% of the global workforce — 375 million workers — to find new career directions.2 However, as the economy of the future becomes less murky and reskilling/upskilling becomes a staple of every career path, there will be a massive scramble to find talent to plug newly created roles in the workforce. This new economy is why people-skills will be so sought after in the future of work, according to April Rudin, CEO and Founder of The Rudin Group. "AI will be a tool to empowerhumans instead of replace them, enabling people to spend time on the things they do best: making relationships, exercising judgment, expressing empathy and using their problem-solving skills." Those cities that remain people-focused will be the ones with talent on-hand, and they'll be the ones to succeed. 3. A Clean Start Provides a Leg Up   Think about the investment that today's economic powerhouses have made in their broader commercial infrastructure. Think about public transportation systems, electrical and IT networking, private development and public zoning districts. Billions of pounds, dollars, yen, renminbi, rupees, euros and more spent on getting those cities ready for the economy of today. How will those investments pay off in the future of work? Today's emerging megacities are "unencumbered by the legacy systems of their larger and more established brethren," according to Mercer's People-First research. While it may require massive investment to install the building blocks of a future-focused economy, there's none of the wasted expense or necessary compromise that comes with retrofitting an outmoded city for the tech-enabled future. Those cities can focus time and resources on building attractive, people-centric cities where employees will want to live, work and raise families in the future. "It's hard to fathom the competitive advantage a modern, mass transportation system gives a city," says Walter Jennings, CEO of Asia Insights Circle. "When economic reforms started in China, Shenzhen was a fishing village of 50,000 people. Today, there are estimates of 12–16 million residents." What's Next?   Let's return to the city planner. You're overlooking your parcel of land, and you're trying to envision the ideal city of the future. We may not know the street names, but we have a better sense of the guiding principles for your soon-to-be booming metropolis. I leave you with my three takeaways, just one lens through which to explore the opportunities which lay ahead with people, technology and the emerging megacities that will power global growth. 1. Build your city (or company) around people. 2. Don't discard valuable assets. There will always be a place for good talent in good places. 3. Look for what will carry you into the future, not what's carried others in the past. 1Desjardins, Jeff, "The Skills Needed to Survive the Robot Invasion of the Workplace," Visual Capitalist, June 27, 2018, https://www.visualcapitalist.com/skills-needed-survive-robot-workplace/. 2Illanes, Pablo, Lund, Susan, Mourshed, Mona, Rutherford, Scott and Tyreman, Magnus, "Retraining and Reskilling Workers in the Age of Automation," McKinsey Global Institute, January 2018, https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work/retraining-and-reskilling-workers-in-the-age-of-automation  

MORE IN CAREER

Mustafa Faizani | 30 May 2019

There is no doubt that family businesses are prominent across the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) in various industries. From small to renowned multinational corporations, family owned and managed companies are the foundation of the modern country. Many of these businesses have been in existence for five decades and still exist today. As the first-generation of individuals begin to step down, we're seeing a shift to second and third generation ownership. It is estimated that, in the Middle East, approximately $1 trillion in assets will be transferred to the next generation of family owned companies over the next decade.1 The transition from the first to the second generation, and increasingly, the second to third generation, will have tremendous implications on the sustainability and growth of these companies. As a result, legacy and succession planning are becoming an increasing concern for the region, as many businesses stand in a position to pass the baton over to the next generation. While existing leaders prefer to keep the business within the family, there are many challenges that can arise if there is no preparation done well in advance of the transition. This lack of preparation is common, as it's easy for leaders to be so involved in the day-to-day running of the business that they lose sight of longer-term, more strategic priorities. The penalty for failing to tackle leadership or ownership changes can be significant. Lack of a clear, strategic succession plan can cause disruption, conflict and uncertainty within the business, making it vulnerable to an acquisition or takeover. The long-term survival of a business and the preservation of the wealth that has been built, will likely depend on getting ahead of those changes through legacy and succession planning. Have a Strong Internal Talent Strategy   Planning can have many benefits. The priority is to ensure leadership continuity, which is an important factor in keeping employees engaged and ensuring retention. It also allows time to hire internal candidates for key positions, therefore avoiding the cost of external searches. Internal candidates know the organization better and tend to have a better chance of success than external hires. Additionally, promoting internally helps retain good people, because they see opportunities for growth and will stay on to pursue them. A strong talent strategy can also fill leadership positions quickly, not only avoiding the potential cost of unfilled positions and errors from a lack of leadership, but helping to circumvent legal consequences from potential missteps. Evaluate Your Operating Structure and Execute in Phases   Leaders often first look at the current reporting structure and organizational chart to evaluate who the next leader(s) may be. However, it is also important to think of an organization's operating structure and how it may change over time. Leaders must consider how functional activities will evolve as the business grows, while also looking at the experience of the shareholders during this significant change. These factors need to be reviewed before selecting the people who will take over the function. As part of this process, it's critical that succession planning is done in phases. Firstly, it is important to identify the roles critical to the business and the pool of successors that best fit the organization's requirements. Ensuring the right assessments to determine readiness levels can solidify the next generation of company leadership. Multiple assessments methods are suitable, including looking at historical measures of performance, 360 leadership behaviors tests and predictive measures of potential. Involve Executive Leadership   Lastly, executive leadership involvement is essential in the succession planning process. The organization's top leaders should be fully on board with the plan to bring in the next generation and meet frequently to discuss strategic talent management issues. The ultimate results of a business succession plan depend on the adherence and commitment to it from the organization. It requires a high level of engagement and continuous efforts to keep the succession moving forward over time, despite inevitable interruptions of operational needs and unexpected changes. To learn more about succession planning for family businesses, visit us here. 1Augustine, Babu, "Middle East's Family Businesses Get Serious on Sustainability" Gulf News, November 7, 2015,https://gulfnews.com/how-to/your-money/middle-easts-family-businesses-get-serious-on-sustainability-1.1614502.

Danielle Guzman | 16 May 2019

Imagine you're tasked with creating a brand-new city from scratch. A broad, meandering river cuts through a level plateau of arable land, and you're responsible for whatever's to come. What do you do first? Lay out a street grid? Install emergency services? Block off land for preservation and development? Think wisely, because your next decision may determine the fate of your city's inhabitants for generations to come. At its core, this is the same decision that local leaders of the world's emerging megacities face today. They may not be starting from scratch, but tomorrow's megacities face a similar potential for dynamic growth and expansion as yesterday's frontier boom towns. What should be their number-one priority when focusing on future development? People. According to a recent report from Mercer titled, "People First: Driving Growth in Emerging Megacities," we must prioritize humans (not robots) for a competitive advantage. We must design technology with humans at the center. To quote Pearly Siffel, Strategy and Geographic Expansion Leader, International, at Mercer, "In the future, work will be less about 'using' technology and more about 'interacting' with technology." 1. Technology Is Fungible, People Are Not   The well-worn axiom that AI will transform the future of work is more true today than ever before, but it misrepresents how the future will be transformed. What may start as a race to adopt and leverage AI in the workplace will inevitably end in a saturation of technology: As soon as one firm unlocks the full potential of automation, it'll be a matter of time before their competitors replicate the model. Who wins in a world where AI is in every office? The organizations with the best talent. Consumer and workforce demands will inevitably adapt to an AI-empowered future, and the real differentiator will be the human skills, such as critical thinking, emotional intelligence and creative problem solving, paired with technology. A recent report by the World Economic Forum outlines the 10 skills humans will need to create value in an increasingly automated world, and it's a great reminder that peoplemust remain the focus if we're to build anything that works in the future of work.1 Tamara McCleary, Founder and CEO of Thulium, summarized this point well in a recent conversation we had: "If we are distracted by all that glitters with the promise of a frictionless future with AI, then we will surely miss the mark. While technology may be an economic accelerator in the future of work, people are still the core drivers of sustained productivity." 2. When AI Is Everywhere, People Will Still Go Somewhere   Everyone's familiar with the dystopic tomorrow-lands depicted in literature and film: techno-centric, automated megacities serviced by an army of robots where people are undervalued. This is not how I envision the future of work. The proliferation of AI may mean some jobs will be automated, but those displaced workers still represent remarkable potential to cities, employers and economies. McKinsey estimates that disruption from digital transformation, automation and AI will force approximately 14% of the global workforce — 375 million workers — to find new career directions.2 However, as the economy of the future becomes less murky and reskilling/upskilling becomes a staple of every career path, there will be a massive scramble to find talent to plug newly created roles in the workforce. This new economy is why people-skills will be so sought after in the future of work, according to April Rudin, CEO and Founder of The Rudin Group. "AI will be a tool to empowerhumans instead of replace them, enabling people to spend time on the things they do best: making relationships, exercising judgment, expressing empathy and using their problem-solving skills." Those cities that remain people-focused will be the ones with talent on-hand, and they'll be the ones to succeed. 3. A Clean Start Provides a Leg Up   Think about the investment that today's economic powerhouses have made in their broader commercial infrastructure. Think about public transportation systems, electrical and IT networking, private development and public zoning districts. Billions of pounds, dollars, yen, renminbi, rupees, euros and more spent on getting those cities ready for the economy of today. How will those investments pay off in the future of work? Today's emerging megacities are "unencumbered by the legacy systems of their larger and more established brethren," according to Mercer's People-First research. While it may require massive investment to install the building blocks of a future-focused economy, there's none of the wasted expense or necessary compromise that comes with retrofitting an outmoded city for the tech-enabled future. Those cities can focus time and resources on building attractive, people-centric cities where employees will want to live, work and raise families in the future. "It's hard to fathom the competitive advantage a modern, mass transportation system gives a city," says Walter Jennings, CEO of Asia Insights Circle. "When economic reforms started in China, Shenzhen was a fishing village of 50,000 people. Today, there are estimates of 12–16 million residents." What's Next?   Let's return to the city planner. You're overlooking your parcel of land, and you're trying to envision the ideal city of the future. We may not know the street names, but we have a better sense of the guiding principles for your soon-to-be booming metropolis. I leave you with my three takeaways, just one lens through which to explore the opportunities which lay ahead with people, technology and the emerging megacities that will power global growth. 1. Build your city (or company) around people. 2. Don't discard valuable assets. There will always be a place for good talent in good places. 3. Look for what will carry you into the future, not what's carried others in the past. 1Desjardins, Jeff, "The Skills Needed to Survive the Robot Invasion of the Workplace," Visual Capitalist, June 27, 2018, https://www.visualcapitalist.com/skills-needed-survive-robot-workplace/. 2Illanes, Pablo, Lund, Susan, Mourshed, Mona, Rutherford, Scott and Tyreman, Magnus, "Retraining and Reskilling Workers in the Age of Automation," McKinsey Global Institute, January 2018, https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work/retraining-and-reskilling-workers-in-the-age-of-automation  

Najla Najm | 02 May 2019

Over the years, we have witnessed the truly remarkable transformation of women in the workforce in Saudi Arabia. The Royal Decree of 2017 recognizing women's right to drive was a monumental step toward enabling the mobility of female employees. However, significant changes began shaping the nation much earlier — from the appointment of the first female Vice Minister in 2009 to welcoming female members in the Shoura Council in 2013. The transformation has primarily been driven by an overall focus on educating women. In fact, in 2008, it was announced that Princess Noura University in Riyadh was the largest university for women in the world.1 These steps are just the tip of the iceberg as Saudi Arabia sets the stage for equal participation on the world stage, which will prove to be a crucial factor in the success of Vision 2030.2 From a global perspective, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is part of a wider dialogue taking place in the workforce. This conversation includes the issue of equal pay in North America, the lack of female board representation in Europe and everything in between. In fact, Mercer runs a campaign in collaboration with the World Economic Forum, which features a study called When Women Thrive. According to the study, at the current rate of change, it will take 217 years to close the global economic gap between the genders. At the same time, it is becoming increasingly clear that gender equality and the participation of women in the workforce must be taken into account for growth in business and society as a whole. The report also suggests that a diverse workforce is a business imperative proven to boost the bottom line. Organizations around the world are realizing the benefits and making a conscious effort to increase representation in senior leadership and enable the upward progression of women. From a local perspective, leading up to Vision 2030, there have been many announcements from notable organizations, including the government and private sector, appointing females in leadership, executive and board of director positions. Recently, Saudi Aramco, the world's most profitable oil company, appointed its first woman to the board, while Citigroup appointed a female as the head of their business in Saudi. Companies are making sustained progress in increasing representation in senior leadership, enabling the upward progression of women and closing the pay gap. They are hiring and promoting talent based on competence, as talent and capability are the determining factors in operational success, and women are ready to lead the way. So, how exactly can organizations in Saudi Arabia ensure women thrive, thereby driving Vision 2030? Today, almost 50% of the population in Saudi Arabia is female, but currently, only 20% of the workforce is female.3 At the same time, females tend to hold a greater percentage of higher education degrees. There is room for utilizing this talent by unlocking the enormous potential of women in Saudi Arabia. The When Women Thrive study outlines ways in which organizations can facilitate gender equality. For example, analyzing workforce data allows employers to see which career experiences have higher developmental value and assess whether or not women have equal access to those opportunities. Employers can then take into consideration reskilling opportunities and optimally deploy talent in a way that ensures female employees are satisfied with their learning. As a result, organizations benefit from having motivated employees that deliver value in new ways. With the large scale of transformation in Saudi Arabia, people and skills will be key to the success of Saudi Arabia's Vision 2030, as people are the driving force behind all great change. Given the recent advancements in opportunities for women and the knowledge and skills they will bring to an increasingly diverse workforce, sustainable growth is dependent on harnessing the right talent to fuel the future. The result is positioning Saudi Arabia from a country that was once oil-driven to one that is talent driven. Over the coming years, it will be fascinating to see how women continue to shape growth in Saudi Arabia to unleash the Kingdom's true potential on the world stage. 1"World's Largest University for Women Launched in Saudi Arabia", Arab News, May 2011,https://www.edarabia.com/21384/worlds-largest-university-for-women-launched-in-saudi-arabia/. 2"Our Vision: Saudi Arabia, the Heart of the Arab and Islamic Worlds, the Investment Powerhouse and the Hub Connecting Three Continents," Saudi Vision 2030, https://vision2030.gov.sa/en. 3Trading Economics, 20 Million Indicators From 196 Countries,https://tradingeconomics.com.  

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