Health

The War for Talent in Growth Economies Starts with Employee Heart Rates

10 January, 2019
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"For employers, unhealthy employees pose risks not only to the current workforce, but also to potential hires and possibly future leaders of the business.”

The resting heart rate for the average adult is somewhere between 60 to 100 heart beats per minute. Lower than 60 beats per minute indicates an individual, such as an athlete, with above average health. More than 100 beats per minute signifies a person with lower than average health—the type of man or woman one sees in almost every workplace, in every city from Bangkok to Nairobi. Modern society has made being unhealthy devastatingly easy.

Unhealthy employees in growth economies pose risks not only to themselves and to their companies—but to the economic viability of their communities as they seek to compete in the global marketplace. Unhealthy employees take more sick days, require more costly health benefits and are generally less productive and energetic than their healthy counterparts.1 The need for healthy, productive employees is not only a concern for employers; it is increasingly becoming an issue among the employees themselves.

As middle classes continue to proliferate in regions from Asia Pacific to Latin America, employees are demanding better working conditions and healthier lifestyles from their professional environments. However, workforces in growth markets continue to gravitate toward megacities with more than 10 million inhabitants—such as Mexico City, Mumbai, Sao Paulo and Shanghai. These population shifts are placing increasing pressure on the resources of these urban areas—exposing employees to unhealthy levels of pollution, sedentary/inactive lifestyles associated with extended commutes and limited access to safe and secure living conditions.

Value the Health of Individual Employees
 

Growth economies are only as strong as the people that comprise them. The success of a business is traditionally measured by profits and losses, customer acquisitions, monthly sales and other data that shows where value is being lost or created. Success, however, is directly impacted by the productivity—and health—of a business’s employees. Every individual employee contributes to the success or failure of entire teams, departments and divisions. Each person counts. Businesses must evolve beyond the tendency to treat employees as a collective workforce of anonymous faces and job titles, and see them as individuals with specific skills, personalities and unique health and well-being needs—both physical and emotional. Simply stocking healthy snacks in the kitchen or giving an employee a birthday card isn’t an effective health initiative or psychological boost for most employees.

Businesses in growth economies gain a competitive edge when they employ workers who feel appreciated as individuals. Attending to the health and well-being needs of every employee (and their loved ones) is a powerful means of communicating respect. Providing employees with access to benefits that genuinely serve their needs and sense of purpose will strengthen their connection to, and appreciation for, the surrounding professional community. In fact, that connection is no longer limited to isolated businesses or economies. A new generation of highly educated workforces throughout growth economies is leveraging unprecedented access to digital technologies—and connectivity—to drive demands for higher standards in the workplace. In particular, developed economies are leading a global conversation about universal employee concerns and workplace expectations—including better health and well-being services, financial wellness programs, professional development and educational support opportunities, and work-related risk management practices.  

Businesses regularly scale to meet increased consumer and client demands, but often neglect to provide individual employees, within expanding workforces, basic support for a healthy work environment (e.g., adequate work stations—ergonomic and supportive chairs, proper monitors, for instance). Issues like unhealthy workspaces can be easily rectified with individual attention. Employers must address these critical details. The negative impact unhealthy employees have on productivity levels, efficiency and the bottom line are well documented.2 For employers, unhealthy employees pose risks not only to the current workforce, but also to potential hires and possibly future leaders of the business.

First Impressions Impact the Hiring Process
 

Today, job candidates interview the company before they agree to being interviewed themselves. Before a diligent job candidate arrives for an interview, they have already researched the company’s website, studied the company’s mission statement and business philosophy—including its commitment to global diversity and inclusion policies—read the CEO’s blog posts and analyzed the benefits offered to individual employees at company headquarters and in local offices. As part of this research, it’s likely the candidate has even read through company reviews and ratings—feedback from both customers and current/former employees—via various online resources.

Smart businesses know that talented professionals have high sensitivities regarding situational awareness, and prepare accordingly. Businesses that do not invest in making a positive first impression with job candidates will lose them, and their skills and talents, to competitors. If a highly desired job candidate walks out of the elevator and passes rows of cubicles lined with unhealthy and tired employees, a sense of concern immediately overtakes them. The health of a business’s employees could, understandably, be a direct reflection of their work-life balance and workplace environment – maybe even their health benefits. If a company’s workforce appears to be overstressed, overworked or uninspired, then that top job candidate will eliminate the potential employer before the first handshake. The impact ‘unhealthy’ employees have on the nuances of employer branding and recruiting are less quantifiable than other workforce metrics—but no less important. Current employees offer future employees a window into their futures.

Rediscovering Balance in the Modern Workplace
 

Workforces and employers in growth economies are struggling to adjust to evolutions in technology and modern work-life balance paradigms. The era of our personal and professional lives being separate states of existence are gone. Digital devices and communication technologies have erased the lines that delineated when and where a person worked. The result is a confusing amalgamation of untethered expectations from bosses and spouses, children and coworkers, personal time and work-related hours. The modern-day employee is trapped in a vortex of demands that are no longer contained by time or place. Unsurprisingly, employees everywhere are suffering, both physically and emotionally, from this imbalance. Many employers in growth markets, thankfully, are finally recognizing this widespread problem. Business leaders in growth markets are implementing real strategies to make their employees healthier, happier and more productive.

Savvy employers acknowledge that healthy pursuits and balanced lifestyles are not personal matters solely pursued outside of business hours. Most employees spend the majority of their waking hours at work, and it is during these hours that employers can offer the most effective programs to achieve good health. In China, Huawei and Perfect World, the winners of Mercer China’s 2016-2017 China Healthiest Company survey, offer employees groundbreaking in-house healthcare programs. The amenities include dedicated nurse practitioners, medical services centers (that provide blood screening and other tests) and meditation sessions designed to decrease stress and increase wellness. The future of healthy employees begins with workplaces that prioritize healthy activities as an important part of an employee’s work schedule. In Latin America, 1 in 3 companies already provide well-being programs for their workforces.4 In Mexico, American Express has implemented health and well-being centers that provide care and support resources to employees; and, in Brazil, employers like Schneider Electric have received recognition and awards for their wellness programs and diversity and inclusion efforts.

An Era of Work and Wellness
 

Effective growth economy workforces of the future will have employees who feel healthy on every level. Reduced absenteeism, lower healthcare-related expenses and increased productivity levels are all obvious reasons to offer in-house wellness resources and programs. In terms of costs and benefits, the math is easy. However, the human impact is invaluable. Employees are a business’s most important investment, and future employees can easily see if an employer is currently investing in the well-being of their people. For today’s top talent, the health of a company’s existing employees can be a deal breaker.

Technology will drive the future of health, especially in the growth economies that quickly embrace digital transformation. Currently, in Brazil there are more than 200 startups developing digital solutions in health management and services.5 Modern devices can constantly monitor our heart rates, stress levels and overall wellness. Both employers and employees will be able to use real-time data to create optimum working conditions and schedules for employees working in a world without boundaries. Encouraging workers to eat better, exercise more and stimulate their minds and creativity through cerebral exercises is critical to building strong employer brands that attract and retain top talent. Companies must offer employees a future without back problems, mental illness and heart rates over 100 beats per minute.


1 Healthy Workforce
https://www.cdcfoundation.org/businesspulse/healthy-workforce-infographic

2 The Portion Of Health Care Costs Associated With Lifestyle ...
https://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/2015/12000/The_Portion_of...

3 Who Are China's Healthiest Employers? – Thrive Global – Medium
Yan Mei - https://medium.com/thrive-global/who-are-chinas-healthiest-employers-72af8c1215b0

4 Health Techs
https://insights.liga.ventures/healthtechs/

5 Health Techs
https://insights.liga.ventures/healthtechs/

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Patrick Hyland, PhD | 17 Oct 2019

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"Are Leaders' Well-being, Behaviours and Style Associated with the Affective Well-being of Their Employees? A Systematic Review of Three Decades of Research." An International Journal of Work, Health & Organisations, Volume 24, Issue 2, 2010,https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02678373.2010.495262. 2. Appelbaum, Steven and Roy-Girard, David. "Toxins in the Workplace: Affect on Organizations and Employees." Corporate Governance International Journal of Business in Society, 2007,https://www.researchgate.net/publication/242349375_Toxins_in_the_workplace_Affect_on_organizations_and_employees. 3. Scott, Elizabeth. "Traits and Attitudes That Increase Burnout Risk." Very Well Mind, May 20, 2019,https://www.verywellmind.com/mental-burnout-personality-traits-3144514. 4. Kashdana, Todd B. and Rottenberg, Jonathan. "Psychological Flexibility as a Fundamental Aspect of Health." Elsevier, Volume 30, Issue 7, November 2010,https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272735810000413?via%3Dihub.

Dr. Avneet Kaur | 03 Oct 2019

The use of on-site clinics has been growing in recent years, with businesses realizing the potential for giving access to quality and timely care to contribute to an increase in productivity, reduce absenteeism and improve employee health. But, are you reaping the full benefits of your on-site clinics? Or, are you just focused on meeting legislative requirements? There are three key things you can do to unlock the full potential of your on-site clinics. In a recent Worksite Medical Clinics Survey, employers with on-site clinics saw a return on investment (ROI) of 1.5 or higher. If you're not seeing similar returns, it may be because your on-site clinic isn't moving beyond basic requirements. Create a Patient-centered Clinic   Ensure the services offered by the clinic are suited to your employees. This will eliminate unnecessary spend on under-utilized services and steer you toward investments that will bring a greater sense of satisfaction, positive health outcomes for your employees and, consequently, a positive impact on your bottom line. Understand what your employee population looks like — in terms of age, gender and nature of work — as this will play a large role in understanding what type of health and social care services, as well as specialists, are needed. In addition to demographic information, it's critical to understand the health needs of your employees — for instance, which common illnesses are prevalent and need to be better managed and which key lifestyle risks need to be averted through education or preventative services. Communicate the Value   The adage of "if you build it, they will come" might not be the best way to yield the desired ROI in this case. It's important to shape communications around services offered on-site by highlighting the value they bring to employees: convenience and easy access to care, coordination and orientation toward quality providers, early detection of illnesses, etc. Effective communication will bring increased utilization and early detection, maximizing your investment as an employer while also contributing to the well-being of your employees. On-site Clinic: The Wellness Hub   When on-site clinics are designed and managed correctly, there's a high return for both employer and employee. Well-designed clinics can play a real gatekeeping role, coordinating employee pathways toward high quality providers and wellness vendors. They can also directly provide prevention and employee education services, which are key to avoid acute and costly care events. At Mercer, we help clients implement the 4-C model of effective on-site clinic management. This extends the value of your clinic from meeting legislative requirements to allowing employers to deliver quality health services that focus on value to the employee. To maximize your on-site clinic, reach out to us today.

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Juliane Gruethner | 31 Oct 2019

International project assignments are one of the current hot topics in global mobility management. A quick poll in conjunction with our Expatriate Management Conference in 2018 showed that, in an increasing number of organizations, the mobility function is responsible for the administration of international project assignments. Nearly 90% of the responding mobility managers confirmed that their organizations have international project assignments, and 80% of respondents are responsible for their administration. With this trend, new challenges are emerging. Let's take a look. Challenge 1: Common Understanding of Terminology   There does not seem to be a common definition of an international project assignment. Mercer's poll showed that about 40% of the responding businesses define an international project assignment as simply an international assignment to a project, regardless of its duration, while 60% specified a period of time. Some organizations also differentiate between project assignments for an external client and internal projects. Apart from the lack of clear definitions, most businesses (73%) do not have any formal policy or regulations for their international project assignments. If they exist, they often overlap with those for traditional long- or short-term assignments. No matter how you approach international project assignments, make sure that your company has a precise definition and corresponding guidelines in place that allow for consistent handling and fair treatment of all internationally mobile employees. For this discussion, we define international project assignments as assignments to client projects abroad, whereas assignments to projects abroad within one organization are called international assignments. 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This transparency leads to higher cost pressure, which calls for a greater flexibility with respect to the applicability of existing internal rules and regulations to be able to offer projects at a competitive price. In conclusion, the short-term business value (winning and conducting the project in a profitable manner) and the mid- to long-term value of international assignments (for example, filling a skills gap in the host location or employee development) have to be balanced diligently, which can be achieved by a thoroughly segmented international assignment policy. Challenge 4: Management of Large Numbers of International Project Assignments   Depending on the industry sector, the number of international project assignments in an organization can be extremely high. One of the respondents in the conference poll indicated that they handle about 23,000 international project assignments per year. Therefore, the resources needed in the mobility function will have to be increased or resources reallocated once mobility takes over the responsibility for international project assignments. You should also review the service delivery model, as well as individual procedures, and if necessary, adapt them to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the international project assignment administration. Using the right technology can also help streamline processes and make a large number of international project assignments manageable. Challenge 5: Deployment to Unknown Places   International project assignments take place not only in the company's regular assignment destinations but also in new locations at client sites. The company, therefore, may not have any resources in or knowledge about the location. Client resources or external vendors can be used to obtain necessary information or perform necessary services, such as immigration or payroll. In addition, if employees perform services in hardship locations, their safety and security need to be considered. Challenge 6: A Matter of Compliance   When it comes to international project assignments, mobility is regularly asked to deliver results even faster than for traditional international assignments, because requirements tend to come up or change at short notice. However, compliance is as complex as for any other international assignments and needs to be evaluated individually. This is true for external as well as internal compliance issues. Although compliance is regarded as one of the most important aspects by many mobility managers, we have seen that compliance is just the tip of the iceberg, and the list of challenges presented in this first part of the article is not exhaustive. We continue our considerations with the companies' duty of care and possible solutions in part 2  of this article. If you'd like to learn more, click here to get in touch with a Mercer consultant.

Alice Harkness | 31 Oct 2019

Benefits have traditionally been provided on a "one-size-fits-all" model, meaning some employees gain greater value than others. Today, employees increasingly expect more personalized benefits that allow them to flex and utilize benefits depending on their particular needs and life stage. This allows employees to feel they are being treated equally, independent of circumstances (i.e., single or married). It's time to break the mold with a "non-traditional" approach that may include well-being incentives, opt-in/out insurance coverage and a design that allows individuals to claim parents' expenses or pet care expenses. Forward-thinking companies are on this journey already, but many aren't, as HR departments overestimate employee's satisfaction with the status quo. Why? They're afraid to ask. The risk of not asking can result in investing valuable budget on unused or underutilized benefits. Get to Know Your Employees Better   Don't be afraid to ask the tough questions. Gather feedback through engagement "spot" surveys or focus groups on what employees like and dislike in current offerings or what else would be beneficial. While it may be impossible to implement everything, it's a great opportunity to engage. Employees may not know what they need. Use data analytics to better understand what types of benefits (especially health) are being used the most and what's essential. Are people reporting that they want more well-being incentives, yet no one is taking advantage of your discounted gym membership offering? By combining qualitative and quantitative data, you can identify gaps. Sometimes, that gap is not on the offer itself but rather the communication around it. Communication Is Key   We often hear from HR, "Our employees have good knowledge of their benefits; we communicate them every year." This is not enough. Effective communication is key. Employees are time-poor with little patience for reviewing the fine print of policies. Why not get feedback on their preferred channels of communication? Find simple ways to communicate regularly, focusing on different benefit offerings. This can include infographics, interactive landing pages, videos or simply shorter, bite-sized information. Don't forget to tell employees why certain benefits are important — they don't always know! Flexible Doesn't Always Equate to $$$   Providing personalized benefits can be costly, but it doesn't have to be. It's about taking your current budget and creatively investing in employees in a way that resonates. Another benefit is confidence in knowing your investment is being used. Companies who invest the time in designing benefits that resonate with employees — throwing out the traditional approach by embracing new ways of more personalized thinking — will see a greater return on investment and a happier, more engaged workforce.

Wejdan Alosaimi | 17 Oct 2019

For many decades, Saudi Arabia — as a nation, culture and economic force — has been inextricably tied to oil exports and the energy industry. However, a bold new vision, named Saudi Vision 2030, aims to wean the country off its dependencies on fossil fuels through the creation of sweeping new reforms and policies. This vision looks to modernize Saudi Arabia, both as a domestic society and a global financial powerhouse. The Power of Embracing Change   In 2016, Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud led the unveiling of the Saudi Vision 2030 initiative, which detailed the nation's unprecedented and extraordinary commitment to emerge as a leader in a rapidly evolving world. As oil prices continue to react to new economic realities and regional political forces shape the roles and objectives of nations throughout the Middle East, Saudi Arabia's decision to proactively embrace change could have extraordinary foreign and domestic ramifications. With a population of more than 33.4 million people and a median age of 25, Saudi Arabia faces a future filled with significant challenges and opportunities.1 Saudi Vision 2030 is a road map for how the nation will empower its millions of young citizens to work and thrive in a globalized world that increasingly views petroleum as an outdated and harmful source of energy. A shift in long-established revenue resources and economic paradigms requires a fundamental shift in local workforce skill sets and proficiencies with modern technologies. As other nations are slow to adjust to climate change and other geo-economic shifts, Saudi Arabia is poised to exemplify to the rest of the world how governments can leverage policy reform to enhance the lives of people both inside and outside the country's borders.2 Accommodating a Complex Global Economy   Saudi Vision 2030 will have a profound impact on rapidly growing economies, such as India, that seek to leverage digital transformation while implementing innovative domestic and workforce policies. In fact, the fate of Saudi Arabia and India are becoming increasingly intertwined, as India — unlike many western economies — requires more oil to empower its robust economic rise. Industrialized markets, in areas such as Europe and the United States, are seeking greener alternatives and more electric vehicles for transportation demands, but India remains heavily dependent on fossil fuels. By 2040, India will need to process up to 10 million barrels of crude oil every day to support its expanding economy and progressively urbanized populations.3 Saudi Arabia, a nation that already has a few notable government policies elevating the standard of living for its citizens (such as offering free college education to all citizens), is further internationalizing its economy by prioritizing privatization. The 2030 plan encourages financial institutions to promote private sector growth, marking a significant development in how the country is aligning its domestic workforces to compete in a globalized economy. The focus on increasing privatization and other non-oil industries — such as construction, finance, healthcare, retail and religious tourism — will create new opportunities for Saudi businesses and entrepreneurs.4 Creating a Future Through Indigenous Resources   Saudi Vision 2030 addresses many of the local, cultural challenges facing the nation, such as the role of women in the workforce and society, the impact of digital transformation and automation, and the need to modernize the sensibilities of Saudi businesses. Allowing women to drive and granting them greater access to economic prosperity — with the goal of increasing women's participation in the workforce from 22% to 30% — has generated positive responses with global investors. The 2030 plan also prioritizes domestic issues and the overall health of its citizens, with the stated objective of raising the average life expectancy from 74 to 80 years and aggressively promoting daily exercise and healthier lifestyles for all Saudi citizens.5 The Saudi government also seeks to bring its society into the digital age by implementing more e-government services that will connect citizens to resources through smartphones, data-centric operations and other technologies. This push will also drive human capital out of government jobs and into the private sector. According to the Mercer Global Talent Trends 2019 report, companies in countries such as India, Brazil, and Japan will experience a 70% increase in automation, boosting their need — like Saudi Arabia — to find new roles and professional development opportunities for workers. The 2030 plan offers an ambitious vision for the nation's indigenous resources. Empowering women and integrating modern technologies throughout its economy and government are just part of this comprehensive strategy. By inviting the global economy to invest in its progressive financial mechanisms and bolster tourism through campaigns highlighting the nation's history, Saudi Arabia is poised to lead its people, and the world, into a future forever defined by a new, modern view of the future. Will it work? The world will know in 2030. Sources: 1. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. "Saudi Census: The Total Population." General Authority for Statistics, Accessed 11 July 2019,https://www.stats.gov.sa/en/node. 2. Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud. "Vision 2030." Vision 2030, 9 May. 2019, https://vision2030.gov.sa/en. 3. Critchlow, Andrew. "India is too important for oil titan Saudi to ignore." S&P Global Platts, 6 Mar. 2019, https://blogs.platts.com/2019/03/06/india-important-oil-saudi/. 4. Nuruzzaman, Mohammed. "Saudi Arabia's 'Vision 2030': Will It Save Or Sink the Middle East?" E-International Relations, 10 Jul. 2018, https://www.e-ir.info/2018/07/10/saudi-arabias-vision-2030-will-it-save-or-sink-the-middle-east/. 5. "Saudi Arabia Vision — Goals and Objectives." GO-Gulf, 14 Jul. 2016,https://www.go-gulf.com/blog/saudi-arabia-vision-2030/.

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