Innovation

Kenya’s Silicon Savannah Is Driving Africa’s Unique Economic Rise

30 October, 2018
article-img
"Kenya’s vaunted Silicon Savannah continues to advance the prominence of e-commerce and online shopping throughout the continent of Africa.”

Kenya’s vaunted Silicon Savannah continues to advance the prominence of e-commerce and online shopping throughout the continent of Africa. Online retailer Jumia, headquartered in Nairobi, grossed $597 million in 2017, expanding its reach from four countries to 14.[1] Now, as Africa’s startup epicenter seeks to attract more international investors, tech-savvy entrepreneurs and local suppliers, it is catalyzing a profound shift in consumer behavior across Africa.

Leapfrogging the Retail Divide

 

Megacompanies like Amazon and Alibaba have changed the core of retail shopping in western and eastern markets, but the continent of Africa has yet to witness the ascendance of tech gurus like Jeff Bezos or Jack Ma. For Africa, that’s just fine. A new generation of young tech pioneers is driving digital transformation throughout the continent, and changing the way consumers not only purchase products, but organize their lives.

For decades, markets in Africa have been incredibly challenging places to shop. Online shopping and digital banking, however, are enabling African retailers and consumers to leapfrog from shopping experiences defined by antiquated infrastructure, unreliable banking mechanisms and poor distribution processes, to streamlined e-commerce experiences. The impact of improved online connectivity (Kenya ranks among the world’s fastest internet speeds[2]) and M-Pesa, the mobile banking platform that streamlines financial transactions and microfinancing, are leading a revolution in consumer expectations throughout Africa. This elevation of consumerism, will not be spread evenly throughout the continent.

The Incomparable Future of Africa

 

Investors are learning that digital transformation in Africa will not evolve in the same ways as in western and eastern cultures. Human intuition posits that economic priorities and trends in one area of the world can serve as precedence for other areas of the world. But this ilk of thinking is misguided with respect to the circumstances in Africa. The explosion of the middle class in places like China will not be reflective of increasing wages across Africa. Multinational corporations must be mindful that different cultures espouse different values, and those values guide how populations perceive, save and spend money.

The African continent, and its 1.2. billion people, live in very different nations and cultures. Investors and financial prognosticators cannot approach Africa with the same strategies and expectations as they do other large populations, such as India’s 1.32 billion people or China’s 1.38 billion people. Africa’s spectrum of governments, cultures and economic scenarios span a vast array of unique obstacles and opportunities. Africa’s rising middle class isn’t as intent on purchasing products that symbolize societal status or seeking individual attention. Instead, Africa’s consumers are proving to be more conservative, and are reallocating extra income to savings or family networks in areas with less economic viability.[3]

Africa, Technology & Time

 

One of the top-selling items on Jumia is disposable diapers, which provides a glimpse into how consumers in Africa are prioritizing their financial resources.[1] The obsolescence of traditional cloth diapers for more expensive disposable diapers indicates that convenience and time management are leading drivers of purchases in an evolving continent. Though luxury items such as cosmetics have failed to gain traction, e-commerce is changing consumer behavior when it comes to providing the most valuable resource in anyone’s life: time. It all begins with access to the internet.

Eighty-five percent of Kenya’s population is online.[4] As the country’s hubs in Nairobi and Mombasa continue to attract innovative companies and ambitious entrepreneurs, the businesses arising from the Silicon Savannah such as Twiga—which connects local farmers to stores in more urban settings—are changing everything from supply chains and distribution to the transparency of operations. In fact, technologies such as blockchain could significantly reduce corruption throughout Africa, saving tech startup entrepreneurs time (not months, but years) navigating costly bureaucracies and political quagmires when establishing their businesses.

Though the continent of Africa is full of rich and disparate cultures and countries, Kenya and the Silicon Savannah have proven to the international investment community that positive changes transcend borders and barriers. Kenya’s tech hubs are incubators for ideas and businesses that will transform not only Africa, but the world. After all, there was a moment when Amazon and Alibaba were small startups with big dreams. All they needed was a place to call home and time to grow. For African entrepreneurs that home is the Silicon Savannah… and the time is now.

 

1 Meet the Startup Building a Market From Scratch To Become Africa's Alibaba Matina Stevis-Gridneff
https://www.wsj.com/articles/with-c-o-d-and-goat-promotions-jumia-aims-to-be-africas-alibaba-1527073200?mod=e2tw
2 Kenya's Mobile Internet Beats the United States For Speed Lily Kuo
https://qz.com/1001477/kenya-has-faster-mobile-internet-speeds-than-the-united-states/

3 3 Things Multinationals Don't Understand About Africa's Middle Class William Attwell
https://hbr.org/2017/08/3-things-multinationals-dont-understand-about-africas-middle-class

4 Africa Internet Users, 2018 Population and Facebook Statistics
https://www.internetworldstats.com/stats1.html

More from Voice on Growth

Jackson Kam | 11 Jul 2019

Is the next global financial crisis just around the corner? If so, will it be markedly different from the last crisis? And is there a possibility the contagion will come from today's emerging markets, such as China, Turkey or Argentina? While the future is uncertain and uncontrollable, you can take calculated steps as a business leader to prepare now for what may come later. Emerging Market Economies Are on the Rise   The strength of emerging market economies was one of several top concerns for leaders in 2018, according to the Mercer Global Talent Trends study, and it continues to be a concern today. While Asia, Latin America and Africa steadily replace the North-Atlantic-centric economies as the world's engines of growth, the global economy is experiencing increasing impacts due to their growing strength. Ardavan Mobasheri, managing director and chief investment officer at ACIMA Private Wealth, believes the global leadership baton will have been completely passed to the faster-growing economies by 2030. He states, "By the end of the third decade of the century, the transition will likely be complete, with the anchors of global economic growth cast across the Pacific and the Southern Hemisphere." But as the world adjusts to the growing strength of emerging market economies, it must also adapt to those economies' inevitable speed bumps. "Speed Bumps" Are Starting to Form Globally   Emerging market assets are now retreating in the face of increasing headwinds across their geographies, including production slowdown, rising debt, higher inflation rates and slides in currencies.1 "The contagion in emerging markets happens through different channels, and it tends to be greater in periods of monetary tightening in developed markets," Pablo Goldberg, a senior fixed-income strategist with BlackRock, tells CNBC.2 "Liquidity is an issue. Investors will sell what they can sell." Desmond Lachman, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and former deputy director for the International Monetary Fund's Policy Development and Review Department, writes that U.S. economists and policymakers are ignoring risks posed by emerging economies at their own peril. "They fail to see that years of massive Fed balance sheet expansion and zero interest rates created the easiest of borrowing conditions for the emerging markets," Lachman writes. "By so doing, they removed economic policy discipline from those economies and allowed large economic imbalances in those economies to develop, especially in their public finances." Now that more capital is flowing back into U.S. assets deemed safer than emerging market assets, the acute economic vulnerabilities built up within the emerging market economies during the years of "easy" money are being revealed. These vulnerabilities, if left unchecked, will likely continue to grow and spread globally, extending their implications even further into the years to come. Business Leaders Can Adapt — Here's How   To best prepare for an uncertain financial future and avoid those vast repercussions, you'll want to first take notes on the aftermath of the last financial crisis — it can teach some strong lessons on how the global economy and financial system work. For example, according to the Mercer report, "10 Years After the Global Financial Crisis: 10 Lessons to Learn," one of the most important lessons from 2009 shows that U.S. policymakers' policies, record low policy interest rates, vast liquidity injected into the banking system and quantitative easing produced unexpected outcomes across the globe. While the monetary policies haven't been inflationary in terms of consumer prices, they have been inflationary in terms of asset prices. Now, policy rates are increasing in some economies, but the full consequences of the last crisis' aftermath on all of the world's economies are still unknown, even today. Keeping that in mind, you can take these three steps as a business leader to prepare for the next crisis: 1.  Don't abandon diversification, widely known as "the only free lunch in investment." 2.  Be dynamic, and be prepared to rotate out of assets currently at close-to-record highs if they become unfavorable once investors realize their valuations may not be based on strong fundamentals, such as underlying growth in profits. 3.  Don't abandon active management, as conditions will inevitably change. Taking these three simple steps will allow you to stay nimble and flexible enough to adapt to any situation — even a financial crisis. As markets endure various metamorphoses, remember these lessons and keep these tips in mind to ready your organization for any crises to come. Sources: 1. Teso, Yumi and Oyamada, Aline, "Emerging Markets Retreat Amid Global Growth Concerns: EM Review," Bloomberg, February 15, 2019, https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-02-15/emerging-market-rally-abate-as-trade-concern-returns-em-review./ 2. Osterland, Andrew, "Emerging markets, despite strengths, still get no respect," CNBC, October 1, 2018, https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/01/emerging-markets-despite-strengths-still-get-no-respect.html. 3. Lachman, Desmond, "We ignore risks posed by emerging economies at our own peril," American Enterprise Institute, September 17, 2018, http://www.aei.org/publication/we-ignore-risks-posed-by-emerging-economies-at-our-own-peril/.

Lewis Garrad | 11 Jul 2019

We live in a period of transformative change. It's difficult to talk about any aspect of business these days without touching on what the "future of work" means and what its implications are for individuals, companies and societies. Part of the reason for this is that we are all increasingly aware of the technological advances, changes in government policies and shifting employee expectations that are reshaping what we know as work. As artificial intelligence (AI) and automation infuse into everyday life, the opportunities to reinvent how people will work and live are significant. What does this mean for the employee experience in this age of disruption? How does an organization build an employee experience program that's relevant for this modern world? The Role of HR: Connectivity in the Human Age   According to Mercer's 2019 Global Talent Trends report, 73% of executives predict significant industry disruption in the next three years — up from 26% in 2018. Along with the constant change that disruption brings is the emergence of several human capital risks, such as a decline in employee trust and an increase in employee attrition. Organizations are realizing that people-centered transformation is the key to transferring the shockwaves of disruption into sparks of brilliance. This translates into a need for HR to lead at the drafting table, yet only two in five HR leaders participate in the idea-generation stage of major change projects today. To ensure the Human Agenda remains at the heart of change, HR needs a permanent place in the design process, rather than being a late-to-the-party guest. A critical contribution the HR function will make is helping to design and deliver exceptional employee experiences. Understanding the Employee Experience   How do you capture the moments that matter in an employee's life cycle? From onboarding to having a new manager or getting promoted, critical experiences help shape an employee's connection to the organization. Each employee is different, with diverse needs and talents — and over the course of a career people are exposed to different events and experiences. Some experiences enhance their fit with the organization, some do not and others undermine it. This translates into varying levels of employee and business performance. A more digital HR team, combined with data and analytics that new tools bring, can help leaders understand these experiences at a deeper level. Although it is still common for organizations to conduct episodic surveys of employee attitudes once a year, many are now looking to augment their employee-listening strategy with more fluid pulse surveys to provide deeper insight. Using an employee experience platform, HR teams can now conduct on-demand surveys as and when needed, and employees can give feedback when it's most relevant, with actions aligned to specific needs and timing. Platforms, like Mercer's Allegro Pulsing Tech, enable HR teams to take an active-listening approach to understand experiences over time. This generates better insights into multiple touchpoints, providing HR the opportunity to design more engaging experiences across the employee life cycle. This sets in motion a culture where employees feel heard and are supported and encouraged to do their best work every day. Increasingly, organizations acknowledge that the employee experience is as important as the customer experience. Research has shown that companies leading in customer experience often do so via exceptional cultures and engaged people. The importance of investing in the employee experience can't be ignored. Building a 21st Century Employee Experience Program   Enabling employees to thrive requires intentional redesign of critical employee experiences, using new technology and AI to make work more inclusive, personalized and focused. To do this, organizations need an employee-listening program that uses multiple methodologies to generate deeper insights for diverse stakeholders, including the employees themselves. This new type of organizational research takes an evolving approach to measurement and uses new technology to support more integrated analyses and more experimentation within the organization to generate real learning. The goal is for everyone to have a broader and deeper understanding in an optimal manner to generate a more compelling employee experience, more effective teams and a higher-performing organization. In this age of disruption, as the pace of change accelerates, individuals need support in finding new ways to adapt and contribute. Without help, individuals, organizations and societies will fail to thrive. As more tasks get automated, HR — as the guardian of the employee experience — is best placed to lead this reinvention.

| 10 Jul 2019

Having trouble picturing AI in your workplace? It’s already here. Robots are learning to respond to external stimuli. And while it looks simple, it’s actually a massive step forward into the future of work. Creative response and problem solving are critical if AI is going to work alongside people in the office. So what looks like an opening door, is actually an unlocked future. The future of work is here. Can you see it?  Our deep expertise, powerful insights, and real-world solutions help the people and organizations we serve take steps today to secure a better tomorrow.

more in innovation

Jackson Kam | 11 Jul 2019

Is the next global financial crisis just around the corner? If so, will it be markedly different from the last crisis? And is there a possibility the contagion will come from today's emerging markets, such as China, Turkey or Argentina? While the future is uncertain and uncontrollable, you can take calculated steps as a business leader to prepare now for what may come later. Emerging Market Economies Are on the Rise   The strength of emerging market economies was one of several top concerns for leaders in 2018, according to the Mercer Global Talent Trends study, and it continues to be a concern today. While Asia, Latin America and Africa steadily replace the North-Atlantic-centric economies as the world's engines of growth, the global economy is experiencing increasing impacts due to their growing strength. Ardavan Mobasheri, managing director and chief investment officer at ACIMA Private Wealth, believes the global leadership baton will have been completely passed to the faster-growing economies by 2030. He states, "By the end of the third decade of the century, the transition will likely be complete, with the anchors of global economic growth cast across the Pacific and the Southern Hemisphere." But as the world adjusts to the growing strength of emerging market economies, it must also adapt to those economies' inevitable speed bumps. "Speed Bumps" Are Starting to Form Globally   Emerging market assets are now retreating in the face of increasing headwinds across their geographies, including production slowdown, rising debt, higher inflation rates and slides in currencies.1 "The contagion in emerging markets happens through different channels, and it tends to be greater in periods of monetary tightening in developed markets," Pablo Goldberg, a senior fixed-income strategist with BlackRock, tells CNBC.2 "Liquidity is an issue. Investors will sell what they can sell." Desmond Lachman, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and former deputy director for the International Monetary Fund's Policy Development and Review Department, writes that U.S. economists and policymakers are ignoring risks posed by emerging economies at their own peril. "They fail to see that years of massive Fed balance sheet expansion and zero interest rates created the easiest of borrowing conditions for the emerging markets," Lachman writes. "By so doing, they removed economic policy discipline from those economies and allowed large economic imbalances in those economies to develop, especially in their public finances." Now that more capital is flowing back into U.S. assets deemed safer than emerging market assets, the acute economic vulnerabilities built up within the emerging market economies during the years of "easy" money are being revealed. These vulnerabilities, if left unchecked, will likely continue to grow and spread globally, extending their implications even further into the years to come. Business Leaders Can Adapt — Here's How   To best prepare for an uncertain financial future and avoid those vast repercussions, you'll want to first take notes on the aftermath of the last financial crisis — it can teach some strong lessons on how the global economy and financial system work. For example, according to the Mercer report, "10 Years After the Global Financial Crisis: 10 Lessons to Learn," one of the most important lessons from 2009 shows that U.S. policymakers' policies, record low policy interest rates, vast liquidity injected into the banking system and quantitative easing produced unexpected outcomes across the globe. While the monetary policies haven't been inflationary in terms of consumer prices, they have been inflationary in terms of asset prices. Now, policy rates are increasing in some economies, but the full consequences of the last crisis' aftermath on all of the world's economies are still unknown, even today. Keeping that in mind, you can take these three steps as a business leader to prepare for the next crisis: 1.  Don't abandon diversification, widely known as "the only free lunch in investment." 2.  Be dynamic, and be prepared to rotate out of assets currently at close-to-record highs if they become unfavorable once investors realize their valuations may not be based on strong fundamentals, such as underlying growth in profits. 3.  Don't abandon active management, as conditions will inevitably change. Taking these three simple steps will allow you to stay nimble and flexible enough to adapt to any situation — even a financial crisis. As markets endure various metamorphoses, remember these lessons and keep these tips in mind to ready your organization for any crises to come. Sources: 1. Teso, Yumi and Oyamada, Aline, "Emerging Markets Retreat Amid Global Growth Concerns: EM Review," Bloomberg, February 15, 2019, https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-02-15/emerging-market-rally-abate-as-trade-concern-returns-em-review./ 2. Osterland, Andrew, "Emerging markets, despite strengths, still get no respect," CNBC, October 1, 2018, https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/01/emerging-markets-despite-strengths-still-get-no-respect.html. 3. Lachman, Desmond, "We ignore risks posed by emerging economies at our own peril," American Enterprise Institute, September 17, 2018, http://www.aei.org/publication/we-ignore-risks-posed-by-emerging-economies-at-our-own-peril/.

Eduardo Marchiori | 27 Jun 2019

Migration in the business world has evolved into a complex, global exchange of human power and intellect among nations with distinct cultures and workforce needs. This ongoing balancing of human capital with economic needs continues to impact the geopolitics of the world. However, digital transformation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution are changing the role and value of migrant workforces in profound ways. From Muscles to Motherboards   Machines and computers are increasingly able to perform jobs once held by low-skilled migrant workforces — with greater efficiency and lower costs, too. This worldwide development poses unprecedented challenges for migrant workers, nations and the global economy, as automation and tech continue to replace human labor in various industries, such as farming, automotives and manufacturing. A potential surge in unemployed workers with diminished earning prospects has many countries worried about widespread economic strife and political chaos. What, exactly, will the world look like when automation in the Fourth Industrial Revolution replaces the livelihoods of the 258 million international migrants who make a living by traveling to destinations that offer unskilled unemployment?1 The Promise of the Unknown   Like previous industrial revolutions, the Fourth Industrial Revolution will mean different things to different people. Digital transformation has made it easy to access almost any information via the Internet, and it's given entire populations — especially migrant workers — new opportunities to receive an education and learn new skills, trades and professions. Countries once hindered by poverty and economic isolation are embracing these new opportunities. For example, India, which has a population of 1.3 billion, expects its digital transformation market to reach $710 billion by 2024.2 For migrant workers, upskilling and professional development is critical to job security. Many countries and governments have recognized the need to provide their citizens with the skills and knowledge needed to compete in the age of automation — and that starts with workers having access to these technologies to edify their value and marketability in a competitive world. However, in countries like Argentina, Brazil and the U.S., people feel strongly that their fates are up to themselves instead of their governments and that they are individually responsible for handling the sweeping changes of digital transformation.3 For some, this means migrating to nations and economies that offer better prospects than their current circumstances. A World of Evolving Needs   As witnessed throughout history, migrant workers are drawn to regions where suitable jobs are available. In a world defined by automation and computer technologies, a new era of needs has emerged. In developed countries, such as Japan, South Korea, Spain, and the U.S., birth rates are declining at an extraordinary rate.4 Of particular concern in South Korea and Japan is societal aging, where the number of elderly people is increasing dramatically, while birth rates are declining — there's a lack of younger people who can care for the aging population and generate much-needed taxes through employment to fund retirement for older populations. Japan and South Korea are employing robots and automation to tend to the psychological, emotional and physical needs of elderly citizens, but these technologies are unable to provide the financial resources and domestic services these nations need to continue operating. Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, has introduced extensive reforms, often referred to "Abenomics," which proposes to loosen long-held cultural constraints by integrating more women into the workplace at every level of influence. However, the most controversial aspect of Abenomics is the intention to open Japan up to migrant workers to alleviate internal workforce deficiencies that require uniquely human capacities — a move which many Japanese citizens consider to be a threat to their cultural identity.5 But without younger workers to stabilize the economy, Japan might not have a choice. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is changing the game, and many countries will need migrant workers to fill the gaps between the evolving roles of man and machine. For centuries, migrants have worked hard to fulfill their personal needs — which, in turn, also serves the needs of the employing countries that require their labor. In this modern economic landscape, automation and tech may force change upon job functions, but the need for human capital endures. Sources: 1. "International Migration Report," United Nations, 2017, https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/migration/publications/migrationreport/docs/MigrationReport2017_Highlights.pdf。/ 2."India Digital Transformation Market to Reach $710 Billion by 2024: P&S Intelligence", Prescient & Strategic Intelligence, 5 de março de 2019. https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2019/03/05/1747720/0/en/India-Digital-Transformation-Market-to-Reach-710-Billion-by-2024-P-S-Intelligence.html。 3. Wike, Richard and Stokes, Bruce, "In Advanced and Emerging Economies Alike, Worries About Job Automation," Pew Research Center, September 13, 2018, https://www.pewglobal.org/2018/09/13/in-advanced-and-emerging-economies-alike-worries-about-job-automation/。 4. Kotecki, Peter, "10 Countries at Risk of Becoming Demographic Time Bombs," Business Insider, August 8, 2018, https://www.businessinsider.com/10-countries-at-risk-of-becoming-demographic-time-bombs-2018-8。 5. Yoshida, Reiji, "Success of 'Abenomics' hinges on immigration policy," https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/05/18/national/success-abenomics-hinges-immigration-policy/#.XJr1GK2ZOgR。

Vineet Malhotra | 17 Apr 2019

Musicians, poets and philosophers have spent entire lifetimes asking the question, "Who am I?" In the not-so-distant future, the answer to that question may be stored in our personal blockchain profiles — digital "arks" that contain the details of every decision, action and purchase we've made since the day we were born. Say goodbye to your birth certificate, credit score, passport, professional resume and medical history, and say hello to the future of blockchain: your blockchain profile. Your unique answer to the question "Who are you?" will be a chronological, hyper-detailed, immutable record that says with unprecedented certainty, "This is who I am." Blockchain will not live inside our thoughts, emotions, dreams or nightmares. It will not capture the inner dialogues people reveal in personal diaries or while talking to the bathroom mirror in the morning. Blockchain will, however, never forget when you broke your arm at the age of five (climbing a bannister), how your heart rate spiked when you first met your spouse (you dropped your drink) or that you paid extra for rush delivery of a new pair of black shoes (your cousin's wedding). Blockchain may not be the "you" robed Greek philosophers had in mind, but it will be the "you" the rest of the world sees — ideally, with your permission. Know Your Rights in a Digital World   Businesses want access to your decisions. Information detailing why you choose to vacation in Vietnam, eat mussels at your favorite Italian spot every Tuesday night or only use a medium-bristle toothbrush is valuable to companies that want to sell you — and people like you — airline tickets, fresh seafood and toothpaste. Every online decision you make and action you take is data that reveals part of your personality and thought processes. In recent years, businesses and policymakers have debated how much access companies should have to an individual's personal decisions — especially what they read, click on and buy online. While there are powerful forces seeking to retain control over the data individuals create when using online services, the winds are shifting, and regulatory momentum is beginning to favor the individual. In May 2018, the E.U. set forth the landmark General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) that firmly establishes basic legal rights regarding data privacy, ownership, control, consent and portability for all of its citizens, regardless of where they live.1 In the U.S., the HIPPA Privacy Rule establishes national standards to protect individuals' medical records and other personal health information.2 These regulations are in place to protect citizens from organizations who may seek to use personal data for purposes other than what it was collected for, or for which consent has been explicitly given — and provide instruments to exact considerable penalties on entities that violate those laws. In an era of digital transformation, it is critical that people appreciate the value of their personal data and the extent of their rights to privacy. For Sale: Sleeping Habits and Exercise Routines   Personal data is now part of the supply-and-demand dynamics driving capitalistic enterprises. Consumers not only possess purchasing power but also access to the thoughts and activities that precede particular purchases. This information is invaluable to companies that use data-driven strategies to sell their products and services to targeted consumers. Before blockchain technology, it wasn't possible to have a comprehensive record that kept track of an individual's purchases and behaviors within the context of everything else happening in their lives. But now, it is possible. Today, blockchain makes it possible for people to have an immutable profile of unimaginable detail, one that begins on the day they're born and develops throughout their entire lives — recording everything from when they lost their first tooth to the names of their grandchildren. Every doctor visit, every homework question, every mouse click, every page view. Businesses, naturally, will develop innumerable ways to incentivize people to allow access to their data. With individual rights established as the legal default, consumers will hold the power in this relationship and can monetize their data by renting access to various aspects of their blockchain profiles — from their sleeping habits to exercise routines. As deeper access is granted and more data sources are connected, behaviors can be predicted with greater accuracy, increasing the value of an individual's profile. In effect, individuals will be able to self-identify as willing marketing targets who offer their comprehensive descriptive profiles for sale in an emerging digital marketplace for personal data — a development that will radically alter the business of advertising, data research and analytics. A World of 8.5 Billion "Personhoods"   In 2030, the global population is expected to reach 8.5 billion. By that time, blockchains could consistently, reliably and securely organize data around the individuals who comprise the world's communities and nations. This makes person-centric societies technically possible, where citizens' actions and behaviors are digitally recorded in their "personhood" — an immutable record that serves as a single source of truth to their experiences and sensibilities. People, in essence, will regularly create real-time data that is chronologically added to their collective profile — which includes health records, educational backgrounds, professional credentials, voter registrations, driver's licenses, criminal histories, financial status and any other notable aspect of being a person. "Personhood" could become the universally accepted record to which all identity-related information can be tied. All the processes once needed to validate identity will be replaced by an individual's comprehensive blockchain profile. The commoditization of personal data will profoundly impact how people relate to businesses and each other. Will being held accountable to one's own "personhood" — and knowing that the details of our lives will forever be recorded in our blockchain profile — change how we behave? Will attempting to increase the value of one's "personhood" become an extension of trying to improve their own lives? Or vice versa? The rise of "personhood" could change our collective understanding of ownership in ways the human race hasn't witnessed since the concept of personal property rights first emerged. The Future Challenges to a Blockchain World   There are always casualties to sweeping technological advancements. With the proliferation of blockchain technology and the rising value of individuals' data, societies risk becoming even more polarized along financial and class lines. Individuals with more purchasing power inherently possess data that is more valuable to businesses that sell products and services or governmental institutions that could benefit from their financial support or influence. Those without money or access to modern technologies will face profound disadvantages unless governments — especially those in growth economies — implement regulations that protect vulnerable citizens from being left behind. Growth economies must also find ways to integrate intermediaries who will fight the prospect of obsolescence as blockchain technologies become more popular. Though the future is difficult to predict, and change always creates challenges, history teaches us that where value is created, technology eventually wins. The future of blockchain presents the human race with the opportunity to understand each other, and ourselves, in unprecedented ways. By providing new insights into human behaviors, relationships and business interactions, we can learn from each other and improve conditions for everyone. Perhaps blockchain data will even convincingly demonstrate to humanity how similar we all are. In the future, the most important questions people can ask themselves is not, "Who am I as a person?" but, "Who are we as a society?" The answer to that question may create the type of civilization only dreamed of by musicians, poets and philosophers. Interested in learning more about blockchain? Check out: Mercer Digital's Blockchain 101 Overview. 1Palmer, Danny. "What Is GDPR? Everything You Need to Know About the New General Data Protection Regulations." ZDNet, https://www.zdnet.com/article/gdpr-an-executive-guide-to-what-you-need-to-know/. 2"The HIPAA Privacy Rule." Office for Civil Rights, https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/index.html.  

back_to_top