Health

Office life can be extremely stressful, especially with the competitive nature of work and long hours that can lead to stress and sleep disorders for some employees. In fact, research by Mercer Marsh Benefits for our 2018 Medical Trends Around the World survey showed that globally the top three risk factors for employees remain metabolic and cardiovascular risk, dietary risk and emotional/mental risk. To put the global mental health problems into perspective, 1 in 3 people in the UK have been recorded as suffering from mental health issues.     The emphasis is now on employers to help with the mental wellbeing of their employees by providing comprehensive wellbeing strategies for emotional and mental health. Adopting integrated health and wellbeing strategies underpinned by stronger digital and data capabilities will be a critical factor in managing the rising costs of workforce health benefit programs. Employers are encouraged to adopt a whole system approach to wellbeing, in which mental health is recognized alongside physical health, as one of the essential building blocks to help employees fulfill their potential. But unfortunately, employers are slow to realize the risks concerned with mental health, with less than 50 percent of insurers and respective employer medical plans providing access to personal counseling. In Asia, mental health tends to be a taboo subject as it has a stigma around it and employees are concerned about coming forward with their issues in a fiercely competitive workplace environment. The Hong Kong Mental Morbidity Survey, a three-year study launched in 2010, found fewer than a quarter of people with common mental disorders had sought medical support in the previous year, and only 3.9 percent had seen a psychologist for help, reported SCMP. When we asked insurers: What three risk factors do you think influence employer sponsored group medical costs the most? Globally, as I mentioned earlier, mental health was third with 43 percent. However, in Asia mental health ranked bottom, behind occupational risk (44 percent) and environmental risk (51 percent), with 31 percent.  But this doesn’t mean that mental health benefit programs in Asia should be ignored by companies, even with the increase in medical costs worldwide. According to the 2018 Medical Trends Around the World survey, the global medical cost in 2017 increased at 9.5 percent, almost three times the inflation rate of 3.4 percent. Hong Kong’s increment was below the average global level but higher than the other two developed Asian cities, namely Singapore (8.6 percent) and South Korea (7 percent). “Hong Kong’s medical costs significantly outpaced the local inflation rate and employer’s cost on health care continues to grow. Therefore, employers should review the existing design of health care plans, further invest in data analytics and adopt a whole system approach in order to effectively manage employee health care cost,” Billy Wong, Mercer’s Health & MPF Business Leader, Hong Kong said. Employers can tackle the risk of mental health problems by launching workplace health strategies. Check out my ideas on ways to keep your workforce mentally healthy and happy.  Mindfulness Training: By implementing mindfulness training at work, employees will be able to effectively deal with stress, increase productivity in the office, maintain greater focus and their overall health will improve. But what exactly is mindfulness training? It’s a meditation technique aimed at focusing the mind on the present moment, which enhances an employee’s ability to work on day-to-day tasks and find balance. Fitness programs: The physical health benefits of working out are well documented, but exercise is also an effective way to boost your mental health. Exercise releases endorphins which make people feel happy. Employees who are feeling stressed, depressed or suffering from anxiety are advised to workout for 30 minutes a few times a week.  Flexible work schedule: Working from home and flexible work schedules give employees the freedom they need to stay motivated. The flexibility allows employees to take a break and lowers the risk of burnout. Working from home can reduce parenting stress as employees are afforded the flexibility to meet the needs that come with having a family. These factors and more increase employee morale and help to reduce absenteeism.  

Liana Attard | 21 Feb 2019
tiles1
Health

A healthy workforce is vital to ensuring the productivity of a company, but is it the sole responsibility of employers to keep their employees healthy or should the responsibility be shared? The size of a company obviously plays a part as smaller businesses find it harder to commit finances to ensure the wellbeing of their staff compared to bigger multinationals. However, budget is a big concern for lots of companies when it comes to building benefits packages, a point that was highlighted at the 2018 Employee Benefits event through a live audience poll. Attendees were asked: What’s stopping you from taking action on wellness initiatives? Budget was the top answer, with HR professionals saying they are worried about ROI. But this doesn’t mean employees at smaller companies are left behind. Benefit plans can be adapted to individual markets and tailored to deliver exactly what employees expect. For example, in Japan, which is well-known for its intense work culture, companies offer health benefits that include mandatory stress-related exams. On an even smaller scale, companies can boost the wellbeing of their staff by doing something as simple as adding healthy food to the pantry. Health is also about mental wellbeing. In Singapore, employees are known to ask about a company’s leave policy and if there’s flexible working hours before starting a job. Both are important when it comes to helping employees deal with stress and enjoying a healthy work-life balance. Furthermore, in the office, more and more companies are using wellbeing ambassadors to help get their benefits messages across. The ambassadors are chosen because they are passionate about health and they share their knowledge with colleagues. Another question for the audience at the event was, “What is important to your decision making process on where your focus should be?” The top answers were assessing internal data and how the packages will fit into their company. In today’s world, the benefits programs we use were designed 10 years ago, and a lot of them are no longer relevant to employees’ needs. Times have changed, and it is now up to employers to evolve and reimagine ways to reach people and restructure their programs – keeping the employee experience at the center. The aforementioned topics and more, were discussed when experts in the fields of health and benefits gathered at the  2018 Employee Benefits event in Singapore to participate in a panel discussion on “Health and Wellness - A Shared Responsibility”. The panel discussion was moderated by Liana Attard, Asia Consulting Leader, Mercer Marsh Benefits, and featured Fiona Chia, Founder of Health Can Be Fun, Masters in Human Nutrition; Gan Sow Chat, AP Benefits Director, Honeywell International; Rahul Ramaswami, International Benefits Manager, Standard Chartered; and Godelieve van Dooren, Regional Industries and Products Leader, Mercer.

Liana Attard | 15 Nov 2018
tiles1

According to the recent report “Medical Trends Around the World 2018” by Mercer Marsh Benefits (MMB), international medical costs increased by an average of 9.5% in 2017, almost three times the estimated inflation rate. The rising costs associated with healthcare are a pressing concern for HR leaders with a need for resources, policies and practices that support a healthy and productive workforce while keeping expenses to a minimum. HR professionals must leverage the latest disruptive trends and workforce health care strategies to thrive in increasingly competitive business environments where there is a renewed focus on cultivating a thriving and engaged workforce. This requires a proactive effort by HR leaders to move beyond their comfort zones and integrate the following three personas into their role responsibilities and leadership styles and prepare employees for a future where health impacts the wealth of both the individual and the employer. Persona #1: Empathetic Champion of Mental Health   Much has been written about the importance of emotional intelligence or EIQ in leadership roles. However, most of those discussions simply emphasize the value of being able to relate to other people and “walk in their shoes” for a while. As a result, many companies have instituted lifestyle changes to their business models, whether that be through the promotion of flexible-working practices such as allowing employees to telecommute, providing employees career development and educational opportunities, or encouraging employees to volunteer in their community or join a gym. However, focusing on supporting the mental and emotional wellbeing of their employees presents companies with tremendous opportunities to elevate employee productivity, increase workplace morale, reduce absence and improve retention. In fact, the MMB report reveals that less than 50% of insurers and respective employer medical plans provide access to personal counseling. Progressive HR professionals who see through antiquated stereotypes about mental health issues are poised to lead their companies into the future. Preventative holistic care and wellness initiatives can save businesses millions of dollars on health care expenses by proactively preventing and treating employee mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, substance abuse, postpartum mental health, workplace stress, and other often overlooked conditions, as well as areas like sleep disorders. Persona #2: Unrelenting Facilitator-in-Chief   HR leaders must take responsibility for empowering their employees to engage and utilize the resources available to them. HR pros should leverage the various ways their particular workforces interact with information, communicate their needs, and access employee benefit programs. The MMB report elaborates, “The top communication mechanisms for 2017 continued to be fairly traditional: websites, call centers and digital brochures, as well as paper booklets. This is another area ripe for disruption. By assuming the role of Facilitator-in-Chief, HR leaders can directly improve inefficient bureaucracies and processes that hamper the employee-insurer relationship. In China, HR is collaborating with insurers to streamline services and information. “Some insurers in China are helping members by providing pre-authorization and medical provider referrals with ease. Others utilize a care team to provide members with health advisory services, or they have a case manager assist in making decisions. In addition, some insurers are also providing healthcare seminars to help members make smarter decisions regarding their healthcare needs.” HR leaders must advocate for improving technologies and processes that frustrate employees and prevent them from accessing the services they need to work effectively. Persona #3: Political Activist for Policy Change   Meaningful change happens at an excruciatingly slow pace. Governments, legislative bodies, and policymakers lag far behind the evolving demands of modern employees and employers. Today, HR leaders play a more important role in communicating the needs of contemporary workforces than ever before. These are revolutionary times – HR, human capital management and industry leaders across the planet must serve as the voice for millions of workers who are being let down by outdated programs that serve misaligned priorities. John Deegan from MMB explains, “As health care costs become more material (outside the U.S.), employers are also questioning the intent and design of programs. Given the digital health revolution underway, we are seeing progressive employers redefine health and benefit principles and question traditional medical insurance designs, many of which were based on receiving crisis treatment in a hospital setting. And while it is starting in the U.S., the evolution towards value-based care, where providers are paid based on outcomes instead of fee for service, will demand innovation from the (global) insurance community.” Only through political mechanisms can enduring changes to insurance regulations be implemented throughout the world’s nations. HR leaders are uniquely positioned to advocate for new health care policies for employees and employers. By adopting these three personas into their leadership dynamics, HR professionals can lead the way to a better, more affordable future. As Andrew Perry of MMB asserts, “Health insurance is ripe for disruption around the world.”  

Liana Attard | 28 Jun 2018
tiles1
Health

How Do You Define Flexible Benefits?   Many employers in Asia view flex as a complicated and difficult-to-administer benefits structure delivered through an expensive portal. This definition of flex programs is no longer correct. Today, “flexible benefits” means offering employees choice through an effective design, delivered via an engaging portal and promoted with unique branding and communications. Flexible benefits can be as simple and straightforward as offering employees the choice of two or three fixed benefits packages or voluntary top-up benefits. Even cash is a form of choice. Why Flex?   The implementation of an effective flex program can be an affordable way for employers to increase the value of benefits while offering options that can easily be tailored to fit diverse employee profiles, needs and life stages. Such programs can increase the value of benefits at no additional cost, fill gaps in employer-paid benefits and build corporate branding through increased engagement. From an employee perspective, flex allows individuals to select the benefits features that best suit them and their families. In more mature markets, such as the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, the flex concept has been used to this effect for some time.  Are Flexible Benefits Working?   Based on the 50 percent of employers say they support offering choices, yet only 16 percent actually offer them1.  Although some employers may be tempted to consider implementing flex, the vast majority choose not to because of the perceived complexity. Thus, despite maintained interest, flex plans in Asia are not picking up momentum. Perception Versus Reality   The unfavorable opinion toward flexible benefits programs in Asia is perpetuated by the fact that few employers use tangible metrics to evaluate their programs. Why Are Flex Plans Failing Asia?   Flexible benefits programs can be simple and effective but have not actually been successful in engaging employees because of four key pitfalls:  1. Too much choice: Existing choice programs struggle to achieve success because they offer too many choices with too little differentiation. This compounds administration complexity and makes communicating benefits difficult. The value of the benefit is lost on employees as they struggle to understand what’s being offered and what it means for them. 2. Designed based on market benchmarking data alone: This means employers are taking an external view only and missing the internal perspective of ensuring the plan supports business goals and meets the needs of their unique employee profile. 3. No regular review: Too often, a plan receives only a few tweaks to design and structure over the years. Only comprehensive, regular revision can ensure that the plan continues to meet changing business goals and employee needs. 4. No branding and/or communication strategy: The program should be branded to resonate with employees, offer engaging, guided decision-making and be communicated throughout the year using various media.   The Importance of Taking a Total Rewards Approach With the current talent shortage in Asia, cash is no longer king. Employer focus needs to shift away from compensation alone. But the reality is that many employers are still struggling to see benefits beyond just medical, risk (life and disability) and retirement programs. Employers need to expand their view of benefits to be all encompassing. Flex isn’t a single component of the total rewards framework but can roll into career, work-life balance, how and where we work (including telecommuting and flexible work arrangements) – event the desks you sit at and the snacks in your pantry. Steps to Implementing an Effective Flexible Benefits Program   Define Your Goals For the program to support the business objectives of the organization, it’s important to define what success looks like for you. Is the ultimate objective productivity? Managing your budget? Or people-related goals, such as retention and attraction? Build a Smart Design Programs should be designed with an understanding of competitor offerings but also with the employer and employee perspective in mind, including cost requirements and employee demographics. Regulatory requirements must also be taken into account. Use data as evidence to support the process of building an effective design. Determine Structure and Financing Once a smart design has been pinned down, how do you effectively deliver the plan? Think through the best structure and platform to deliver your value proposition. This doesn’t have to be via a fancy portal. Where they make sense to promote and showcase the value of the program, you can use existing technology platforms with help from a partner who understands how to maximize employee experience. One of the realities in Asia is that vendor capabilities are limited, so selecting a partner that understands your business and can grow with you into the future is crucial. The cost of the program is also important in this era of increasing cost of care and double-digit inflation. Thinking through the optimal financing approach (for example, self-funded) should not be overlooked. Develop Unique Branding and Communications Unique branding and communications are crucial for differentiating your plan and establishing an emotional connection with employees. Look to differentiate yourself as an employer via benefits that are more than just medical- and protection-related. Consider the entire benefits spectrum and how benefits are delivered and branded. Communication should be simple, targeted and deployed frequently via multiple channels. Ultimately, employees cannot appreciate and understand something they know nothing about, which is why communication is just as important as design. Despite common perception, implementing a flexible benefits program can be simple, easy to administer and even used as a cost-containment strategy if managed properly. But unique benefits programs also lend another, arguably greater, advantage — differentiation and a way to connect with your employees. To attract the best talent — a necessary strategy as Asia becomes a main player on the world economic stage — organizations have to expand their packages beyond compensation and a basic benefits offering.   1 https://www.marsh.com/ae/en/services/employee-health-benefits.html

Liana Attard | 17 Apr 2017
tiles1

A healthy workforce is vital to ensuring the productivity of a company, but is it the sole responsibility of employers to keep their employees healthy or should the responsibility be shared? The size of a company obviously plays a part as smaller businesses find it harder to commit finances to ensure the wellbeing of their staff compared to bigger multinationals. However, budget is a big concern for lots of companies when it comes to building benefits packages, a point that was highlighted at the <a title="2018 Employee Benefits event" href="https://www.asean.mercer.com/events/2018-employee-benefits-event.html">2018 Employee Benefits event through a live audience poll. Attendees were asked: What’s stopping you from taking action on wellness initiatives? Budget was the top answer, with HR professionals saying they are worried about ROI. But this doesn’t mean employees at smaller companies are left behind. Benefit plans can be adapted to individual markets and tailored to deliver exactly what employees expect. For example, in Japan, which is well-known for its intense work culture, companies offer health benefits that include mandatory stress-related exams. On an even smaller scale, companies can boost the wellbeing of their staff by doing something as simple as adding healthy food to the pantry. Health is also about mental wellbeing. In Singapore, employees are known to ask about a company’s leave policy and if there’s flexible working hours before starting a job. Both are important when it comes to helping employees deal with stress and enjoying a healthy work-life balance. Furthermore, in the office, more and more companies are using wellbeing ambassadors to help get their benefits messages across. The ambassadors are chosen because they are passionate about health and they share their knowledge with colleagues. Another question for the audience at the event was, “What is important to your decision making process on where your focus should be?” The top answers were assessing internal data and how the packages will fit into their company. In today’s world, the benefits programs we use were designed 10 years ago, and a lot of them are no longer relevant to employees’ needs. Times have changed, and it is now up to employers to evolve and reimagine ways to reach people and restructure their programs – keeping the employee experience at the center. The aforementioned topics and more, were discussed when experts in the fields of health and benefits gathered at the <a href="https://www.asean.mercer.com/events/2018-employee-benefits-event.html" title="2018 Employee Benefits event">2018 Employee Benefits event in Singapore to participate in a panel discussion on “Health and Wellness - A Shared Responsibility”. The panel discussion was moderated by Liana Attard, Asia Consulting Leader, Mercer Marsh Benefits, and featured Fiona Chia, Founder of Health Can Be Fun, Masters in Human Nutrition; Gan Sow Chat, AP Benefits Director, Honeywell International; Rahul Ramaswami, International Benefits Manager, Standard Chartered; and Godelieve van Dooren, Regional Industries and Products Leader, Mercer.

/content/mercervog/en/authors/liana-attard Liana Attard | 15 Nov 2018
tiles1

According to the recent report “Medical Trends Around the World 2018” by Mercer Marsh Benefits (MMB), international medical costs increased by an average of 9.5% in 2017, almost three times the estimated inflation rate. The rising costs associated with healthcare are a pressing concern for HR leaders with a need for resources, policies and practices that support a healthy and productive workforce while keeping expenses to a minimum. HR professionals must leverage the latest disruptive trends and workforce health care strategies to thrive in increasingly competitive business environments where there is a renewed focus on cultivating a thriving and engaged workforce. This requires a proactive effort by HR leaders to move beyond their comfort zones and integrate the following three personas into their role responsibilities and leadership styles and prepare employees for a future where health impacts the wealth of both the individual and the employer. Persona #1: Empathetic Champion of Mental Health &nbsp; Much has been written about the importance of emotional intelligence or EIQ in leadership roles. However, most of those discussions simply emphasize the value of being able to relate to other people and “walk in their shoes” for a while. As a result, many companies have instituted lifestyle changes to their business models, whether that be through the promotion of flexible-working practices such as allowing employees to telecommute, providing employees career development and educational opportunities, or encouraging employees to volunteer in their community or join a gym. However, focusing on supporting the mental and emotional wellbeing of their employees presents companies with tremendous opportunities to elevate employee productivity, increase workplace morale, reduce absence and improve retention. In fact, the MMB report reveals that less than 50% of insurers and respective employer medical plans provide access to personal counseling. Progressive HR professionals who see through antiquated stereotypes about mental health issues are poised to lead their companies into the future. Preventative holistic care and wellness initiatives can save businesses millions of dollars on health care expenses by proactively preventing and treating employee mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, substance abuse, postpartum mental health, workplace stress, and other often overlooked conditions, as well as areas like sleep disorders. Persona #2: Unrelenting Facilitator-in-Chief &nbsp; HR leaders must take responsibility for empowering their employees to engage and utilize the resources available to them. HR pros should leverage the various ways their particular workforces interact with information, communicate their needs, and access employee benefit programs. The MMB report elaborates, “The top communication mechanisms for 2017 continued to be fairly traditional: websites, call centers and digital brochures, as well as paper booklets. This is another area ripe for disruption. By assuming the role of Facilitator-in-Chief, HR leaders can directly improve inefficient bureaucracies and processes that hamper the employee-insurer relationship. In China, HR is collaborating with insurers to streamline services and information. “Some insurers in China are helping members by providing pre-authorization and medical provider referrals with ease. Others utilize a care team to provide members with health advisory services, or they have a case manager assist in making decisions. In addition, some insurers are also providing healthcare seminars to help members make smarter decisions regarding their healthcare needs.” HR leaders must advocate for improving technologies and processes that frustrate employees and prevent them from accessing the services they need to work effectively. Persona #3: Political Activist for Policy Change &nbsp; Meaningful change happens at an excruciatingly slow pace. Governments, legislative bodies, and policymakers lag far behind the evolving demands of modern employees and employers. Today, HR leaders play a more important role in communicating the needs of contemporary workforces than ever before. These are revolutionary times – HR, human capital management and industry leaders across the planet must serve as the voice for millions of workers who are being let down by outdated programs that serve misaligned priorities. John Deegan from MMB explains, “As health care costs become more material (outside the U.S.), employers are also questioning the intent and design of programs. Given the digital health revolution underway, we are seeing progressive employers redefine health and benefit principles and question traditional medical insurance designs, many of which were based on receiving crisis treatment in a hospital setting. And while it is starting in the U.S., the evolution towards value-based care, where providers are paid based on outcomes instead of fee for service, will demand innovation from the (global) insurance community.” Only through political mechanisms can enduring changes to insurance regulations be implemented throughout the world’s nations. HR leaders are uniquely positioned to advocate for new health care policies for employees and employers. By adopting these three personas into their leadership dynamics, HR professionals can lead the way to a better, more affordable future. As Andrew Perry of MMB asserts, “Health insurance is ripe for disruption around the world.” &nbsp;

/content/mercervog/en/authors/liana-attard Liana Attard | 28 Jun 2018
tiles1

How Do You Define Flexible Benefits? &nbsp; Many employers in Asia view flex as a complicated and difficult-to-administer benefits structure delivered through an expensive portal. This definition of flex programs is no longer correct. Today, “flexible benefits” means offering employees choice through an effective design, delivered via an engaging portal and promoted with unique branding and communications. Flexible benefits can be as simple and straightforward as offering employees the choice of two or three fixed benefits packages or voluntary top-up benefits. Even cash is a form of choice. Why Flex? &nbsp; The implementation of an effective flex program can be an affordable way for employers to increase the value of benefits while offering options that can easily be tailored to fit diverse employee profiles, needs and life stages. Such programs can increase the value of benefits at no additional cost, fill gaps in employer-paid benefits and build corporate branding through increased engagement. From an employee perspective, flex allows individuals to select the benefits features that best suit them and their families. In more mature markets, such as the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, the flex concept has been used to this effect for some time.&nbsp; Are Flexible Benefits Working? &nbsp; Based on the 50 percent of employers say they support offering choices, yet only 16 percent actually offer them1.&nbsp;&nbsp;Although some employers may be tempted to consider implementing flex, the vast majority choose not to because of the perceived complexity. Thus, despite maintained interest, flex plans in Asia are not picking up momentum. Perception Versus Reality &nbsp; The unfavorable opinion toward flexible benefits programs in Asia is perpetuated by the fact that few employers use tangible metrics to evaluate their programs. Why Are Flex Plans Failing Asia? &nbsp; Flexible benefits programs can be simple and effective but have not actually been successful in engaging employees because of four key pitfalls: &nbsp;1. Too much choice: Existing choice programs struggle to achieve success because they offer too many choices with too little differentiation. This compounds administration complexity and makes communicating benefits difficult. The value of the benefit is lost on employees as they struggle to understand what’s being offered and what it means for them. 2. Designed based on market benchmarking data alone: This means employers are taking an external view only and missing the internal perspective of ensuring the plan supports business goals and meets the needs of their unique employee profile. 3. No regular review: Too often, a plan receives only a few tweaks to design and structure over the years. Only comprehensive, regular revision can ensure that the plan continues to meet changing business goals and employee needs. 4. No branding and/or communication strategy: The program should be branded to resonate with employees, offer engaging, guided decision-making and be communicated throughout the year using various media. &nbsp; The Importance of Taking a Total Rewards Approach With the current talent shortage in Asia, cash is no longer king. Employer focus needs to shift away from compensation alone. But the reality is that many employers are still struggling to see benefits beyond just medical, risk (life and disability) and retirement programs. Employers need to expand their view of benefits to be all encompassing. Flex isn’t a single component of the total rewards framework but can roll into career, work-life balance, how and where we work (including telecommuting and flexible work arrangements) – event the desks you sit at and the snacks in your pantry. Steps to Implementing an Effective Flexible Benefits Program &nbsp; Define Your Goals For the program to support the business objectives of the organization, it’s important to define what success looks like for you. Is the ultimate objective productivity? Managing your budget? Or people-related goals, such as retention and attraction? Build a Smart Design Programs should be designed with an understanding of competitor offerings but also with the employer and employee perspective in mind, including cost requirements and employee demographics. Regulatory requirements must also be taken into account. Use data as evidence to support the process of building an effective design. Determine Structure and Financing Once a smart design has been pinned down, how do you effectively deliver the plan? Think through the best structure and platform to deliver your value proposition. This doesn’t have to be via a fancy portal. Where they make sense to promote and showcase the value of the program, you can use existing technology platforms with help from a partner who understands how to maximize employee experience. One of the realities in Asia is that vendor capabilities are limited, so selecting a partner that understands your business and can grow with you into the future is crucial. The cost of the program is also important in this era of increasing cost of care and double-digit inflation. Thinking through the optimal financing approach (for example, self-funded) should not be overlooked. Develop Unique Branding and Communications Unique branding and communications are crucial for differentiating your plan and establishing an emotional connection with employees. Look to differentiate yourself as an employer via benefits that are more than just medical- and protection-related. Consider the entire benefits spectrum and how benefits are delivered and branded. Communication should be simple, targeted and deployed frequently via multiple channels. Ultimately, employees cannot appreciate and understand something they know nothing about, which is why communication is just as important as design. Despite common perception, implementing a flexible benefits program can be simple, easy to administer and even used as a cost-containment strategy if managed properly. But unique benefits programs also lend another, arguably greater, advantage — differentiation and a way to connect with your employees. To attract the best talent — a necessary strategy as Asia becomes a main player on the world economic stage — organizations have to expand their packages beyond compensation and a basic benefits offering. &nbsp; 1 https://www.marsh.com/ae/en/services/employee-health-benefits.html

/content/mercervog/en/authors/liana-attard Liana Attard | 17 Apr 2017
tiles1

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